CERVICAL CANCER: A vision for the global elimination of cervical cancer through systematic international vaccination programmes.

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Dec. 16, 2019

SCIENTIFIC

CERVICAL CANCER

A panel convened at the 7th Annual Symposium on Global Cancer Research have outlined a vision for the global elimination of cervical cancer through systematic international vaccination programmes.

Eliminating Deaths From Cervical Cancer—Report of a Panel at the 7th Annual Symposium on Global Cancer Research, a Satellite Meeting at the Consortium of Universities for Global Health 10th Annual Meeting

Agnes Binagwaho et al Journal of Global Oncology , no. 5 (November 01, 2019) 1-7

ABSTRACT

This is a summary of the presentations addressing approaches and achievements to reach the goal of eliminating cervical cancer as a global public health problem that were delivered at the 7th Annual Symposium on Global Cancer Research at the 10th Annual Consortium of Universities for Global Health Meeting in March 2019.

Dr Princess Nothemba Simelela, Assistant Director-General for Family, Women, Children and Adolescents, World Health Organization, gave an introduction to the World Health Organization–led Cervical Cancer Elimination Initiative and the emerging conceptual framework and targets that will shape the global 2020 to 2030 strategy.

Subsequent presentations shared experiences from national programs in Rwanda (Agnes Binagwaho), Latin America (Patricia J. Garcia), and Senegal (Babacar Gueye and J. Andrew Dykens.

Successes in intensified human papillomavirus vaccination and screening with follow-up treatment of early and advanced lesions detected are highlighted as well as the challenges and obstacles in achieving and maintaining high coverage in Africa and Latin America. With strong political leadership, commitment of national stakeholders, and the use of proven and cost-effective approaches to human papillomavirus vaccination, screening, and treatment, the vision of a world free of cervical cancer and saving women’s lives every year by preventing deaths from cervical cancer will be achievable in the next generation in all countries.